Plans made for abandoned Argentine yacht La Sanmartiniana

THREE  representatives of the owners of the abandoned Argentine yacht FIPCA La Sanmartiniana, picked up last October by the Falklands' Patrol Vessel, visted the Falklands last month, according to a press statement from the Falkland Islands Government.

The group visited  from July 10-16 in order to  assess the vessel’s condition and make the necessary plans to effect vital repairs  to enable the vessel to return to Argentina at a later date which is yet to be determined.  
 

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Any new airlinks with South America will not include Argentina assures government

FIG responds to Argentine interpretation of Prime Minister’s letter

A LETTER from the British Prime Minister Theresa May to the Argentine President, which refers to making progress towards new airlinks between the Falklands and South America, has been interpreted by Argentina as an airlink with Argentina. However, the Falkland Islands Government has dismissed this interpretation.

The letter also referred to making progress on the removal of, “restrictive hydrocarbons measures.”

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New Head of Policy for Falkland Islands Government

DIANE Simsovic has been announced as the new Head of Policy for the Falkland Islands Government.
                                                         
Ms Simsovic is Canadian and has more than 35 years’ experience in the private and public sectors, with a background working at municipal, provincial and federal levels of Government, primarily focussing on economic development and growth. Ms Simsovic has also previously worked in environmental engineering and management consultancy.

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Editor's Column - July 1 guest editorial from Peter Young

ONE of my first reactions to the referendum result last week, after disbelief and shock, was a strong feeling of sadness that younger generations of Brits would not enjoy, as I and millions of others had, almost unfettered freedom to roam across Europe on holiday. I’ve been lucky enough to drive from London to Turin in Italy, and through Belgium, Germany and Austria to Hungary.  I’d also travelled by train to southern Poland from my suburban station in London. All of this travel without needing a visa or seeing a border guard, except when my navigator took a wrong turn and we went through Switzerland.

I can see how young people would value this freedom and why they could feel angry that they had been denied this by older voters who mainly voted to leave the EU.

However, one of the more interesting statistics to emerge once the dust settled was that, although 75% of under-24s voted to Remain in the EU, compared to only 39% of over-65s, crucially, it is reckoned that only 36% of under-24s voted, compared with a massive 83% of over-65s!

Read more: Editor's Column - July 1 guest editorial from Peter Young

Brexit and the Falkland Islands

A LIST of the potential implications on the Falkland Islands, of the UK exiting the EU, is to be drawn up between the Chief Executive and the Falklands private sector and presented to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office Minister Hugo Swire.

In an interview with Penguin News this week Members of Legislative Assembly Roger Edwards, Ian Hansen and Michael Poole (pictured) accepted that it was a time of uncertainty for the Islands, “but we will find a way through it,” said MLA Poole.

He said there were, “obviously key things in terms of access and tariffs that will be focussed on,” adding that the Chief Executive Keith Padgett had already begun work on looking at the potential risks and implications across the Islands. 

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